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Revolutionary War Soldiers of Walker County...

Jacob Gibson

In 1818, Jacob Gibson removed from Grainger County, Tennessee to Walker County, Alabama.  He and his several sons patented land about a mile below Cordova on the western bank of the Mulberry River at Bough Bend, just above present-day Dovertown.

In 1833 he submitted the first of his two affidavits in support of a claim for the benefit of a pension first enacted by Congress in the year 1820.  In 1836 he submitted the second affidavit and was approved to receive a pension that same year.

Jacob GIBSON died sometime between the date of his second/last affidavit and the 1840 Federal Census.  He died at home in Walker County.  The year of his death is inexact, but I estimate it to have been in the year 1838-9, due to other facts.

-- Jacob Gibson was born in 1762 in Frederick County, Virginia

-- was living in Guilford County, North Carolina at the outbreak of the Revolution

-- was 16 1/2 when, due to a law enacted by the North Carolina Legislature, he was drafted into the NC Line and marched to the Siege of Charlestown, SC where he was taken prisoner by the British and was impressed into service on a British Man-of-War which impressment he refused to do.

-- was taken, with three others, to the Island of Jamaica and imprisoned in the notorious Bath Prison at Kingston, where the other three died.

-- was released at Kingston and made his way to a port at the north end of the island where he encountered an American vessel captained by a Captain Joseph Smith of Middletown Connecticut who gave him food, clothes and passage to his homeport (Middletown).

-- from Middletown, Connecticut, Jacob Gibson began the long trek south, heading to his "native" county (Frederick Co, VA).

-- due to lack of funds, he was forced to stop in Pennsylvania and work for several months, before continuing to Frederick County, Virginia

-- he remained in Frederick County three years (where in 1787 he married Sarah Kemp age 15)

-- he (they) removed to Greene County, Tennessee (that part of northeastern Tennessee originally claimed and governed by North Carolina), but then removed to Grainger Co., Tennessee, due to Indian hostilities, where they remained 11 years

-- he then removed to Guilford Co., Tennessee where he remained 16 years

-- he then removed to Walker Co., Alabama where, at the time of the writing the first affidavit, he had been living for more than 15 years.

 --he died and was buried in Walker County, Alabama

 

(Contributed by Neil Lamont - 2005)

 


 

John Henson Sr.

Buried at Henson-Lenior Cemetery

John Henson Sr. 1767 - 1852

Pvt North Carolina Militia- Revolutionary War

 

(Submitted by Michelle Brown Golden)

 

    

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