Mobile County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. Its name is in honor of a tribe of Indians, the Maubila tribe. As of 2008, its population was 406,309. Its county seat is Mobile, Alabama. The entire county is included in the Mobile metropolitan statistical area.

While still a part of the Mississippi Territory, Mobile County was created by a proclamation of Governor Holmes of the Mississippi Territory on December 18, 1812. The area became part of the Alabama Territory, on August 15, 1817, on the day the Mississippi Territory formed a state constitution and was split in half. Two years later, the county became part of the State of Alabama, when granted statehood on December 14, 1819.

The city of Mobile has always been the county seat. Both the county and city derive their name from Fort Louis de la Mobile, a French fortification established (near present-day Mount Vernon, Alabama) in 1702. The word "Mobile" is believed to stem from a Choctaw Indian word for "paddlers". The area was occupied by French colonists from 1702-1763, by the British from 1763-1780, and by the Spanish from 1780-1813. Three separate courthouse fires occurred in the years 1823, 1840, and 1872.
(information from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_County,_Alabama)
 

Mobile County Coordinator:

Ann Allen Geoghegan
ALGenWeb State Coordinator:
Ann Allen Geoghegan

ALGenWeb Assistant State Coordinator: Jeff Kemp
 
 
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