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Canterbury Men

Submitted by Jack Moore

CANTERBURYS IN THE WAR OF YANKEE AGGRESSION

Zachariah Clinton Canterbury, born in Bibb County on March 21, 1826, was a member of Reese's Battery of the Jeff Davis Light Artillery formed in Selma, Alabama, in May of 1861. He enlisted on October 13, 1863. Documents on file at the Alabama Department of Archives and History indicate he died in a Richmond, Virginia, hospital in 1864.

James Monroe Canterbury, born in Bibb County on October 27, 1828, served with the 24th Alabama Infantry Regiment. He was a sergeant assigned to Co. H. His widow filed for pension benefits after the war. Whether he survived the war is unclear at present.

Isaac Monroe Canterbury, born in Bibb County on May 22, 1832, served with the 32nd Alabama Infantry Regiment, was captured and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, where he died on January 3, 1865. He is buried in the Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery. Research to date has not revealed where he was captured.

Samuel Jackson Canterbury, born in Bibb County on June 23, 1830, enlisted in Co. D of the 20th Alabama Infantry at Shultz Creek Baptist Church on July 22, 1861. He served with the 20th all throughout the war. Surrendered at Vicksburg on July 4, 1863 and was paroled to Demopolis, Alabama. Rejoined his unit, fighting at Nashville, Atlanta and in North Carolina. He was serving with consolidated Co. H of the 20th when it was surrendered at Salisbury, North Carolina, on May 2, 1865. He returned to Alabama and died in Tuscaloosa County in 1909.

Thomas E. Canterbury, born in Bibb County on August 27, 1842, enlisted in Co. D of the 20th Alabama Infantry at Shultz Creek Baptist Church on July 22, 1861. He served with 20th throughout his military service. Surrendered at Vicksburg, paroled to Demopolis, and later fought at Nashville and Atlanta. Captured at Averysboro, North Carolina on March 10, 1865. Sent to prison camp at Point Lookout, Maryland. He was released there on oath on June 10 1865. He returned to Alabama and was living in Selma, Alabama, according to the 1870 Census.

Obadiah Polk Canterbury, born in Bibb County on January 15, 1846, enlisted in Co. D of the 20th Alabama Infantry at Shultz Creek Baptist Church on July 22, 1861. He was just 15. Served with the 20th throughout his military service. Surrendered at Vicksburg, paroled to Demopolis and later rejoined the 20th with his brothers Thomas and Samuel. Obadiah was captured at Nashville on December 16, 1864, and sent to prison at Camp Douglas, Illinois (Chicago). He died there on February 5, 1865. He is among approximately 6,000 Camp Douglas POWs who are buried in a mass grave at Oak Wood Cemetery in Chicago. Camp Douglas was the worst Union prison camp.

All of the above men were sons of Shadrack Canterbury of Bibb County.

Jefferson Dock Canterberry (Canterbury), born in Bibb County in 1845, enlisted in Co. B of the 44th Alabama Infantry Regiment at Selma, Alabama, on March 29, 1862. Admitted to the hospital at Camp Instruction on April 14, 1862, complaining of a cough. Returned to duty on May 1, 1862. Died June, 1862 at Selma, Alabama. His father, Nicholas J. Z. Canterberry, who also was with the 44th Alabama, was given a furlough and allowed to take his son's body home to Bibb County for burial. Jefferson Dock Canterberry is buried in Hill-Oldham Cemetery.

Nicholas J. Z. Canterberry, born in Tennessee about 1811, enlisted in Co. B. of the 44th Alabama Infantry Regiment at Selma, Alabama, on March 29, 1862. He and 44th arrived in Richmond on July 1, but the unit was decimated by illness and many, including Nicholas, were listed as not fit for duty on August 31, 1862, and missed the Second Battle of Bull Run. Nicholas was also reported ill on September 17, 1862 and missed the Battle of Sharpsburg. He was discharged from duty for health reasons on October 1, 1862, and he returned to Alabama. He later enlisted in the Bibb County Militia. He is buried next to his son in Hill-Oldham Cemetery.

Andrew Sylvester Canterbury, born in 1819 in Bibb County, enlisted in the 1st Alabama Cavalry U. S. Volunteers, in October 1862, at Huntsville, Alabama. He served with the 1st Alabama for the entire war, participating in Streight's Raid through north Alabama, and the battles at Dalton, Resaca and Kennesaw Mountain in the Atlanta campaign. They served as Sherman's escort in his infamous "March to the Sea." He was mustered out on October 20, 1865, and returned to Alabama. He married the widow of a cousin (L. F. Canterbury) killed in the war and settled down in Lauderdale County, Alabama.

Note: Andrew Sylvester Canterbury and Nicholas J. Z. Canterberry were brothers. (Why their names were spelled differently is anyone's guess, but my grandmother, Florence Canterbury Bryant used -berry and -bury interchangeably.) Their parents were Zachariah Canterbury and Sarah Canterbury, who moved to what is present Bibb County about 1811. Research indicates that James H. Canterbury, Andrew Sylvester's son, was in the 1st Alabama Cavalry, CSA, and his unit opposed his father's unit during several battles in the Atlanta campaign. Marriage records in Lauderdale County indicate that James H. Canterbury married the daughter of the widow his father married.

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